Food safety has been the topic of the week.  On one level food is internationally traded, yet not internationally regulated.  Fish is commonly imported into the US; at the same time sea food is known for having high levels of mercury.  By importing fish we are less aware of how safe it is because the FDA does not have the funding to check it. While this has always been in the back of my head, this past week the cafeteria has offered fish multiple times and I have turned away from it.  Not because I question its nutritional value but I’m more discomforted by the distance that fish may have traveled to arrive in Selinsgrove and what environment it has been exposed to.  This argument can be made for all food, so my idea of not eating it because it is probably imported is not valid.  Nevertheless I would like to refute this with my knowledge of mercury poisoning and my support for a more localized and transparent food system.  If the FDA is not going to be given the capabilities to regulate and monitor all of the food that Americans consume then we have to turn to a more localized system.  This does not mean that our fish will be mercury free or not farm raised, but the connection between the farmer and consumer increases understanding of food and consumer power over the quality of food they eat.  Localized food will be regulated more by the consumers than the government and the food industry.  This change in food system maybe incredibly difficult and take time but for the health of Americans and animals it is necessary.

 

 

The art of cooking is not dead! According to a recent study done by the Share Our Strength’s Cooking Matters program, low and middle income families are cooking dinner almost five nights a week.  More of these families are staying home and cooking, instead of stopping at one of the numerous fast food restaurants scattered throughout the country.  This means that in place of mysterious meat chicken nuggets they’re making meals from scratch or from starter boxes.  Shopping for produce or food in general has also changed; results showing families prefer fresh and healthier choices.  But what caused this? Was it a movement led by the government agencies such as the FDA? Did it start in schools?  Furthermore what is the effect on grocery stores and fast food restaurants? Or will this have an overall impact on American’s health?  Finally what is the effect on the family? Are they spending more time together?

 

Either way I see this as a good sign.  It also seems logical because from personal experience buying food and cooking is healthier, you know what is going into it and it is cheaper.  I would also argue that the increase in home cooking can slowly develop into a movement supporting local buying and growing your own produce.   This means that the local movement can be supported by the lower and middle classes, not just upper class families who are buying expensive organic food.

 

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Food safety has been the topic of the week.  On one level food is internationally traded, yet not internationally regulated.  Fish is commonly imported into the US; at the same time sea food is known for having high levels of mercury.  By importing fish we are less aware of how safe it is because the FDA does not have the funding to check it. While this has always been in the back of my head, this past week the cafeteria has offered fish multiple times and I have turned away from it.  Not because I question its nutritional value but I’m more discomforted by the distance that fish may have traveled to arrive in Selinsgrove and what environment it has been exposed to.  This argument can be made for all food, so my idea of not eating it because it is probably imported is not valid.  Nevertheless I would like to refute this with my knowledge of mercury poisoning and my support for a more localized and transparent food system.  If the FDA is not going to be given the capabilities to regulate and monitor all of the food that Americans consume then we have to turn to a more localized system.  This does not mean that our fish will be mercury free or not farm raised, but the connection between the farmer and consumer increases understanding of food and consumer power over the quality of food they eat.  Localized food will be regulated more by the consumers than the government and the food industry.  This change in food system maybe incredibly difficult and take time but for the health of Americans and animals it is necessary.

The art of cooking is not dead! According to a recent study done by the Share Our Strength’s Cooking Matters program, low and middle income families are cooking dinner almost five nights a week.  More of these families are staying home and cooking, instead of stopping at one of the numerous fast food restaurants scattered throughout the country.  This means that in place of mysterious meat chicken nuggets they’re making meals from scratch or from starter boxes.  Shopping for produce or food in general has also changed; results showing families prefer fresh and healthier choices.  But what caused this? Was it a movement led by the government agencies such as the FDA? Did it start in schools?  Furthermore what is the effect on grocery stores and fast food restaurants? Or will this have an overall impact on American’s health?  Finally what is the effect on the family? Are they spending more time together?

Either way I see this as a good sign.  It also seems logical because from personal experience buying food and cooking is healthier, you know what is going into it and it is cheaper.  I would also argue that the increase in home cooking can slowly develop into a movement supporting local buying and growing your own produce.   This means that the local movement can be supported by the lower and middle classes, not just upper class families who are buying expensive organic food.

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